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Here is our monthly dose of “5-Bullet-Point Friday” a list of NJAEYC public policy stuff we think you might be interested in.

Anything that is BLUE, just click on it for more details

What’s going on in the US

Supporting Prenatal-to-Three with Federal Relief Funds (BUILD Initiative in collaboration with EducationCounsel, Center for Law and Social Policy, Georgetown Center for Children and Families, and Linchpin Strategies August 13, 2021

On August 13, 2021 BUILD Initiative in collaboration with EducationCounsel, Center for Law and Social Policy, Georgetown Center for Children and Families, and Linchpin Strategies presented a document that highlights how the federal relief funds can be used to support infant, toddler, and family well-being through strategies to expand, improve, target, and make early care and education, family support, and maternal and infant/toddler health services more accessible and responsive. The strategies were collected from the actions that 30 Pritzker Children’s Initiative state and local prenatal-to-three coalitions are pursuing.

To read more click here: Supporting Prenatal-to-Three with Federal Relief Funds – Build Initiative

 

What’s going on in NJ

On August 11, 2021, Child Care Aware posted a blog by Sister Donna Minster, President, Child Care Aware of New Jersey and Meghan Tavormina, President, New Jersey Association for the Education of Young Children entitled “Child Care Workforce Compensation: A Key Component for NJ Economic Recovery”. The article brings focus on the critical issue of child care workforce compensation. “The most recent hourly wage data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that the median wage for child care workers in New Jersey is $13.37 per hour. Child care employers want to hire and retain a qualified workforce. But, unless they can pay more competitive wages, individuals who otherwise want to work with children are lured by jobs where they can be paid more for less responsibility, stress, or training. One strategy to address the child care worker shortage (as well as recruitment and retention) is called the Child Care WAGE$ program, an education-based salary supplement program that has supported early childhood teachers, directors, and family child care providers since 1998 in other states. WAGE$ increases the compensation of the child care workforce through salary supplements based on credentials and levels of education.”

To read more click here: Blog | The NJ Early Care and Education Alliance (ccanj.org)

 

What’s coming up

2021 NJAEYC Annual State Conference

“The Comeback Conference” – We’re back, don’t miss out on the 2021 NJAEYC Annual State Conference, on October 21, 2021. We are returning to our in-person format with a great selection of speakers and special guests. NJAEYC hopes to see you all there but register early as space will be limited!

To register click here: 2021 Annual Conference Registration | NJAEYC

Mark Your Calendar! The NAEYC Virtual Annual Conference dates have been announced and will be held Sunday, November 7 through Tuesday, November 9 with a special preview day on Saturday, November 6.

To read more click here: Annual Conference | NAEYC

 

Something you might like

New NIEER Survey Finds Pandemic Continues to Negatively Impact on Young Children and their Parents

Impacts of the Pandemic on Young Children and their Parents: Initial Findings from NIEER’s May-June 2021 Preschool Learning Activities Survey – National Institute for Early Education Research

NIEER has released initial findings from its study, “The Pandemic’s Impact on Young Children and Their Parents”, based on a spring 2021 preschool learning activities survey and two previous surveys NIEER conducted in 2020. The report shows that parental supports for early learning, especially parent-child reading 3 or more times per week, continued to decline and that rates of serious social-emotional problems continued to rise. However, identification of needs and the provision of services for young children with disabilities appears to have improved after an earlier decline. Most parents reported that they likely would send their child to an in-person preschool or kindergarten for the fall despite concerns about COVID-19. More than 80% indicated they would likely take advantage of a free universal pre-K program if it became available in the fall.

To read more click here: Impacts of the Pandemic on Young Children and their Parents: Initial Findings from NIEER’s May-June 2021 Preschool Learning Activities Survey – National Institute for Early Education Research

 

Quote we’re pondering

“Child care is a business. For many programs, private-pay parent fees and subsidies paid by the state for low-income parents comprise the budget. The largest expense for a child care business is related to personnel costs, which comprise 70-80% of the overall cost of a child care program. The remainder of funds are used to pay for fixed costs such as rent or mortgage, utilities, regular maintenance, insurance, food, materials, and other operating costs. Therefore, when wages within community businesses rise, child care programs can’t compete. They simply can’t pay more because to do so, they would have to charge parents more. Yet, parents already struggle with affording child care. It’s just one reason why public education is just that, paid for by the public. “Child Care Workforce Compensation: A Key Component for NJ Economic Recovery”, August 11, 2021, Sister Donna Minster, President, Child Care Aware of New Jersey and Meghan Tavormina, President, New Jersey Association for the Education of Young Children

 

Have a wonderful weekend!

NJAEYC Public Policy Team