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NJAEYC 2017 State Conference

October 21, 2017:

Attention all early childhood professionals! This page will provide you with the most up to date information and forms for the 2017 NJAEYC State Conference.

Location:
DoubleTree Hotel, Somerset, NJ

Request for Proposals

Please use the following form to submit your workshop proposal by April 1, 2017.

Request for Proposals 2017

 

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Professional Development Opportunity!

Southern AEYC presents an evening of professional development at the Sari Isdaner Childcare Center at the Cherry Hill JCC on Springdale Road.

The event will be held on Wednesday, January 25th at 6:15 pm.

For full details and registration form, use the link below!

Jan. 25 Professional Development

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NJAEYC 2016 Conference Handouts

We hope that you enjoyed the 2016 NJAEYC Conference! Below are presenter handouts organized by workshop title.

Getting to Know Boys   Presenters: Darlene Schultz and Dwayne Baker, Jr.

Get Over Your SMP (social media phobia)   Presenter: Cynthia Terebush

I’m So Bored- Helping Children and Teachers Rediscover the Joy of Play   Presenter: Moya Fewson

It’s More Than Just Management: Reflection Supervision   Presenter: Angie DeFazio

Piaget- What is He Talking About?   Presenter: Moya Fewson

Sensory Strategies in the Classroom   Presenter: Eleanor Campbell

Transition Techniques- How to Access the Power of Transitions to Refocus, Instruct an Engage Your Students       Presenter: Monica Levy

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NJAEYC Conference Exhibitors & Program Advertising

Dear Friend of Early Childhood Educators,

2016 Exhibit Contract

Click to download PDF

We’re moving!!!  The 2016 NJAEYC Annual Conference is scheduled for October 13-15, 2016 at the new Harrah’s Conference Center in Atlantic City.

Our conference attracts key people in the field of early childhood education.  With the increased need for our services, we are experiencing enormous growth and are always shopping!  Our participants are interested and responsible for purchasing developmentally appropriate materials and equipment for their child care centers and family child care programs.  We urge you to bring items available for sale.

If you are interested in greater visibility, consider being a conference sponsor.  By funding scholarships and contributing to other costs, sponsors have helped us attract a higher attendance by helping us keep our conference as affordable as possible.  NJAEYC is open to your ideas and suggestions in this area, please contact us.  We want our relationship with our vendors to be one that is mutually beneficial and are interested in exploring ways we can better support each other.

Below you will find the Exhibitor’s contract.  Please submit the contract as soon as possible.  Space is limited, so sign up early!  Tables will be assigned on a first come, first served basis.

DON’T DELAY. SPACE IS LIMITED. REGISTER TODAY!

Sincerely,

Helen Muscato
Conference Coordinator


NJAEYC ANNUAL CONFERENCE
TERMS AND CONDITIONS

  1. Space assignments will be made on a first-come, first-served basis.
  1. Fees are non-refundable. No exhibitor will be permitted to set up unless NJAEYC has received payment in full.
  1. Exhibitors must confine their activities to the table space. Exhibitor display will not be allowed to extend beyond assigned table space into the aisle.
  1. Exhibit set-up will be Thursday, October 13, 2016 from 5:00 pm – 10:00 pm and Friday, October 14, 2016 from 5:00 am to 7:00 am. All tables must be set up by 7:00 am.  Exhibits will be open on Friday from 7:30 am – 6:30 pm and Saturday 7:00 am – 4:15 pm.
  1. Harrah’s will be the host hotel for our NJAEYC 2016 Annual Conference. Please make your lodging reservations by calling (888) 516-2215 and mention Group Code SH10ED6 no later than September 15th.  Conference rates will be offered based on availability.
  1. It is mandatory that each exhibitor carry adequate liability and property insurance. Liability insurance should provide public liability coverage for bodily injury and property damage occurring from an accident in your exhibit booth.  Property insurance should cover theft or damage of your property from the time materials leave their point-of-origin until they reach their post-show destination including the time on the show floor. Some exhibitors also insure against non-arrival of freight or exhibit material at the show site.
  1. Exhibitors may also show support of the conference by sponsoring special events or giveaways or donating door prizes. If your company is interested, or of you have any questions, please give us a call at (732) 329-0033.

NJAEYC Conference Program Advertising

 ***** DEADLINE: AUGUST 8, 2016 *****

The NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION FOR THE EDUCATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN will offer a PROGRAM/AD BOOK for the 2016 Conference.  Each person attending the Conference will receive a program.  Please refer to the advertising prices below and the ad sizes attached.

Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis.  The deadline is August 8, 2016.  If you have any questions, contact the NJAEYC office at (732) 329-0033.  If you wish to reserve an ad space, complete the bottom portion of this form and return it with your payment and camera ready art work for the ad.  You may also e-mail or send ad on disk.

  • BACK COVER: $400.00
  • INSIDE COVER: $275.00
  • FULL PAGE AD: $200.00
  • 1/2 PAGE AD: $125.00
  • 1/4 PAGE AD: $85.00
  • 1/8 PAGE AD (Business Card Size): $50.00

Instructions: 

  1. Fill Out and Submit Reservation Form Below
  2. Submit Payment (Mail Check or Pay Online using PayPal or Credit Card)

Step 1: Program Ad Book Reservation

Step 2: Select Payment

Pay Online:


Select Ad Size



Mail a Check:

Please make check payable to NJAEYC and mail it to:

NJAEYC
P.O. Box 1024
Barnegat Light, NJ  08006


NJAEYC CONFERENCE – OCTOBER 13-15, 2016
EXHIBITOR’S CONTRACT

LOCATION:

Harrah’s Resort, Atlantic City, NJ

FEES:

  • One 6’ table $450
  • Two 6′ tables $750

CONTACT:

Helen Muscato/NJAEYC
P.O. Box 1024
Barnegat Light, NJ 08006

Phone (732) 329-0033
Fax (732) 230-2758
e-mail:  mail@njaeyc.org

INSTRUCTIONS: 

  1. Fill Out and Submit Registration Form Below
  2. Submit Payment (Mail Check or Pay Online using PayPal or Credit Card)

Step 1: Please Register Below

Please fill in completely, as this information will be used for the exclusive vendor listing in our packets.

Please click "submit" before proceeding to payment.

Step 2: Select Payment

Pay Online


Select Fee



Mail a Check

Please make check payable to NJAEYC and mail it to:

NJAEYC
P.O. Box 1024
Barnegat Light, NJ  08006

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Launch of NJSharedResources.org Affords Free Access to 1,200+ Early Childhood Education Resources

NJSharedResourcesResources will support quality child care for practitioners in New Jersey

Manchester, NH – CCA For Social Good®, a division of CCA Global Partners, and The New Jersey Association for the Education of Young Children (NJAEYC), are excited to announce the launch of NJSharedResources.org. NJ Shared Resources, an online knowledge hub, is designed to help manage a child care program more efficiently and effectively and support quality child care. With access to over 1,200 practical resources, including editable templates, checklists, and policies, providers will realize significant time and cost savings, which can be reinvested into improving quality. NJ Shared Resources is available free to members of NJAEYC.

“New Jersey marks the twenty-second state to license an ECE Shared Resources platform managed by CCA For Social Good®,” explained Denise Sayer, Vice President of CCA For Social Good®. “We are thrilled to deliver this valuable resource to thousands of child care providers in New Jersey.”

“NJ Shared Resources will considerably improve the day-to-day operations of our members,” stated Amanda DiScala, President of NJAEYC. “Not only will substantial time savings be realized through the use of the many resources available, but extensive money savings as well.”

The site can be accessed by visiting www.NJSharedResources.org. Interested parties in New Jersey may receive access to the resources by filling out a New Member Request form.

For more information about CCA For Social Good® and ECE Shared Resources, please contact Erin Holt at (603) 626-2109.

For more information about the NJAEYC, please contact Helen Muscato at (732) 239-0033.

# # #

About CCA For Social Good®

CCA For Social Good® is an operating division of CCA Global Partners, a privately held cooperative helping small businesses thrive for 30 years. CCA For Social Good® provides web-based platforms to help thousands of nonprofit organizations and early childhood education (ECE) centers manage their businesses. The platforms (integrated password-protected websites) deliver a set of powerful tools and shared resources resulting in more efficient and successful operations. CCA For Social Good® puts time and money back in the hands of directors and managers of ECE programs, allowing them to focus where it matters most: on their missions. To learn more, please visit www.ecesharedresources.com.

About the New Jersey Association for the Education of Young Children

The New Jersey Association for the Education of Young Children (NJAEYC) is dedicated to advancing excellence in the field of early childhood education.

Our primary attention is devoted to assuring the provision of high quality early childhood programs through improvements in the professional practice and working conditions in the field of early childhood education, as well as by improving public understanding and support and funding of high quality programs in centers, homes, and schools.  The NJAEYC is a statewide association that represents teachers, directors, researchers, professors, volunteers, and others concerned with the well-being of children ages birth through eight.

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NJAEYC and CCA for Social Good to develop an Early Childhood Education (ECE) Shared Resources online platform

Click to download press release

Click to download press release

Over 2,000 New Jersey Child Care Providers to Receive Free Access to Resources that Support Quality Child Care

Launching in the summer of 2015, NJ Shared Resources will save time, reduce costs, and improve quality for childcare centers and home-based providers. 

Manchester, NH – The New Jersey Association for the Education of Young Children (NJAEYC), and CCA For Social Good, a division of CCA Global Partners, are excited to announce they have entered into an agreement to develop an Early Childhood Education (ECE) Shared Resources online platform, to support the work of early child care and education professionals in New Jersey.

“Over 1,200 tools available on NJ Shared Resources will support child care directors in functions such as program administration, marketing, human resources, training, group purchasing, and more,” stated Denise Sayer, Vice President of CCA For Social Good. “The significant time and money savings realized by using the platform will mean less time tied up in handling paperwork, and more time available to spend in the classroom.”

“NJAEYC is committed to supporting high quality early education in New Jersey, “added Amanda Di Scala, President of NJAEYC. “The ECE-specific templates, forms, policies, and how to guides available on NJ Shared Resources will be a tremendous asset to our members, and will prove to ensure quality care for children in our state.”

The site, www.NJSharedResources.org, will mark the twenty-second ECE Shared Resources platform that CCA For Social Good will have launched by the end of summer 2015. The website will be made free to members of the NJAEYC.

For more information about CCA For Social Good and ECE Shared Resources, please contact Erin Hathaway at (603) 626-2109.

For more information about the NJAEYC, please contact Helen Muscato at (732) 239-0033.

# # #

About CCA For Social Good
CCA For Social Good is an operating division of CCA Global Partners, a privately held cooperative helping small businesses thrive for 30 years. CCA For Social Good provides web-based platforms to help thousands of nonprofit organizations and early childhood education (ECE) centers manage their businesses. The platforms (integrated password-protected websites) deliver a set of powerful tools and shared resources resulting in more efficient and successful operations. CCA For Social Good puts time and money back in the hands of directors and managers of ECE programs, allowing them to focus where it matters most: on their missions. To view a sample platform, please visit www.ecesharedresources.com.

About the New Jersey Association for the Education of Young Children
The New Jersey Association for the Education of Young Children (NJAEYC) is dedicated to advancing excellence in the field of early childhood education.
Our primary attention is devoted to assuring the provision of high quality early childhood programs through improvements in the professional practice and working conditions in the field of early childhood education, as well as by improving public understanding and support and funding of high quality programs in centers, homes, and schools. The NJAEYC is a statewide association that represents teachers, directors, researchers, professors, volunteers, and others concerned with the well-being of children ages birth through eight.

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Policy Statement on Early Childhood Suspension and Expulsion Practices Released

Secretary Burwell announced that HHS will dedicate 4 million toward early childhood mental health consultation services.

 

Secretaries Burwell and Duncan Release Policy Statement on Expulsion and Suspension Practices in Early Learning Settings

 

Today, Secretaries Burwell and Duncan announced the release of a policy statement on expulsion and suspension practices in early learning settings at the White House’s Summit on Early Education. Exclusionary discipline practices occur at high rates in early learning settings, and at even higher rates for young boys of color. The effort, part of President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative, encourages states, early childhood programs, and families to partner in preventing, reducing, and eventually eliminating the expulsion and suspension of young children from early learning programs.  As part of this commitment, Secretary Burwell announced that HHS will dedicate $4 million toward early childhood mental health consultation services to prevent this troubling practice and to help all children thrive in early learning settings.

 

See the Policy Statement on Expulsion and Suspension Practices in Early Learning Settings here.

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NJAEYC Helps First Book Donate 365,000 New Books to Children

Thank you so much for all your hard work in Pennsauken last week, sharing your time and energy with First Book! We distributed nearly 365,000 brand new books to children in need, and we were able to do it because of your incredible help!

More than 100 local organizations drove to pick-up books, and an additional 575 nationwide received boxes of books shipped to their door. Our recipient groups are always eager to share their appreciation and enthusiasm:

“THANK YOU so much for all the books that we picked up last week!

It was great to see all the boxes of books that the kids will be getting. 
The warehouse crew was GREAT
!”

Our work isn’t done, though – and yours doesn’t have to be either.  Below, you’ll find a few links to help keep you up to date on what we’re doing, where we’re going, and how many books we’re getting to the kids who need them most.

The easiest way to keep up with us is to sign up for our monthly newsletter. We’re also on Twitter, so follow @FirstBook and get regular updates from us there.  You can even “Like” us on our Facebook page for stories, pictures, and more!

Thank you, thank you, thank you for helping us distribute new books for children in need!

Best,

The First Book Team
(Especially Amanda, Kyle, Kate, Kevin, Anna and Katie!)

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Coping with a School Shooting

Our hearts go out to the family members and others affected by the tragic school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut. We’ve compiled these online resources for parents, teachers, and others working with young children about coping with violence and talking to young children about tragedies they learn about in the media.

The National Association of School Psychologists – Resources to cope with violence
Resources on talking to children about violence, tips for parents, teachers, and school administrators, dealing with a death in a school and more. The Association has listed some of these key resources on their home page for quick access. 

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network – Tips for talking to children about the shooting
Resources on talking to children about the recent shooting, information about the shooting’s psychological impact, tips for parents on media coverage – includes tips specific for preschool-aged children.

The National Education Association – School crisis guide
The National Education Association (NEA) and the National Education Association Health Information Network (NEA HIN) developed this easy-to-use crisis guide with essential, to-the-point advice for schools and districts.

American Academy of Pediatrics – Talking with children
Resources to help parents talk to children about violence and disasters.

Child Care Aware – Helping families and children cope
In the wake of any kind of emergency or disaster – large or small – children and adults may feel anxious about their own safety and security. Child Care Aware offers resources for Parents, Caregivers, School Professionals and more.

American Psychological Association – Helping children manage distress
As a parent, you may be struggling with how to talk with your children about a shooting rampage. It is important to remember that children look to their parents to make them feel safe.

National Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry – Coping with tragic events
In hopes of helping families cope with such tragic events AACAP created a collection of resources including tips for talking to children about Connecticut school shooting.

Tips for Talking to Children and Youth after Traumatic Events
Subtitled “A Guide for Parents and Educators,” this printable PDF contains concise tips for talking to children after traumatic events as well as resource links when more active intervention may be required.
Thank you,
Sandy

Sandra Sheard
1709 12th Street
Hammonton, NJ 08037
856-332-9227
www.sandrasheardconsulting.com
www.facebook.com/sandrasheardconsulting

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Helping Infants and Young Children when Violence Occurs

Download PDF

Click to Download PDF

1. Be there and be calm: Ask children what they know and what they have heard. Listen to the child’s story, follow the child’s lead, and be reassuring about the ways that you will take care of them. Use simple language and correct any misunderstood accounts. Tell a child what they need to know, not all that you know. For example, say something like “Some people did some bad things and other people were hurt. But you are safe here and we will protect you.” Practice these conversations with other adults.

2. Give permission for many different feelings: Infants experience the emotions of sad, mad, glad and worried. As children grow, they experience and express sad, mad, glad, excited, scared and frustrated, and more. Avoid imposing meanings or interpretations on children, but allow them to feel what they feel. Often children will explain their feelings through their body states. Consider asking “where” do they feel as well as “how” do they feel.

3. Share your feelings: It is okay and important for children to know that the adults in their lives have the same feelings when bad things happen. Let children know you feel these feelings and that you are there for them. It is important, however, that you remain in control. Monitor your own emotion and tone of voice. Pay attention to your gestures, affect, and voice because children pay special attention to these ways of communicating. You can help children feel safer and calmer when your behaviors convey these feelings. If your own reaction is difficult to manage, enlist another adult to help you.

4. Limit repeat exposure to images and reports of the events: When children do see images or reports of tragedies, Fred Rogers of Mr. Rogers Neighborhood suggests that we help them “look for all the people who are helping”. Couple the sad tragedy with the comforting presence of others who are helping and taking care of others.

5. Remember the 3R’s of security: Relationships, Routines and Restoration: Both children and adults need the basic “R’s” of safety for comfort and reassurance at times of uncertainty. Highlight relationships with familiar and consistent caregivers, family and friends. Protect and increase routines that are familiar and normalizing such as play time, going to school, reading books, and other patterned activities. Remember the body and the importance of restoration, including appropriate sleeping and eating patterns, and time-limited regression to previously used ways of feeling better, i.e. hugs and physical touch, sensory-based ‘soothies’ like a blanket, stuffed animal or pacifier, and expression of emotion like crying, clinging, whining or wailing.

6. Intervene with the developmental age and stage of the child in mind: Infants require comfort, familiar attachment figures, holding, protection and restoration of order. As language and imagination grow, toddlers and very young children need simple words, repeated reassurances, acceptance of time-limited regression, constant monitoring and love. At each developmental period, the availability and empathic response of a caring, familiar adult begins the process of remediation.

7. Intervene with the particular learning style and temperament of the child in mind: Children with autism and other special needs may process information – gestures, pictures and language – in different ways. Often a “4L’s” strategy may help: Less Language and Longer Latency. This means that you can use fewer words and wait longer for a reply. Ask the child what they were thinking and feeling and even draw pictures or tell stories. Use your own facial expressions, voice and words to reflect and “tune in” to their emotions. If helpful, use pictures or drawings to identify and label different feelings. Be prepared for misunderstandings and misinterpretations, and keep clarifying and reassuring the child that you will be sure they are safe.

8. Provide structure and communicate safety: Uncertainty is the province of adulthood. While we as adults may feel unsure of the possibility of future tragedies, we must always let children know that we will take care of them and protect them. Children thrive when provided structure and safety.

9. Recognize that there are some feelings that we can only share and cannot fix: Children need us to be there with and for them at such times. It’s appropriate to both not have an answer and be with the children in their sadness and confusion.

10. Remember to take care of yourself: If the adults in a child’s life are overwhelmed, overstressed and overtired, it will be more difficult to be safe, secure and stable for the child. Pay attention to the “ABC’s” of self-care: awareness, balance and connection, in your own life. Enlist other adults to help you process what has happened and support you in your support of the child.

G. Costa, Ph.D. 2002/2012; K. Mulcahy, LPC 2012
Montclair State University, Center for Autism and Early Childhood Mental Health
Voice: 973-655-6685  |  Fax: 973-655-5376  |  Website

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